Chaparral: 11 Reasons to Consume This Herb

Chaparral: 11 Reasons to Consume This Herb

Chaparral is well known as an organic treatment for many types of cancer.  It is a desert-dwelling plant primarily harvested in the dry areas of the United States as well as prominently in Mexico.  In climates that support the growth of this herb, it tends to be quite abundant.  Aside from being an easily obtainable natural treatment for cancer, chaparral plants provide a plethora of general health benefits.  It is found commonly in skin care products and tea, similarly to most other herbs with comparable properties.

Enhancements to Your Health by Consuming Chaparral

As mentioned previously, chaparral is a great way to ward off cancer – especially when consumed in the early stages.  Particularly it is suggested by doctors to treat cancer of the liver, kidney, or stomach, mainly due to containing various antioxidants.

  1. The aforementioned antioxidants also act as a way to clear blood vessels, promote general heart health, remove toxins from the bloodstream, and prevent various effects of aging.
  2. Though mostly speculation, concentrated forms of the chaparral herb are suspected to increase blood circulation.
  3. Due to its antibacterial qualities, this herb is often used in place of or in tandem with toothpaste.  Aside from remedying halitosis, it also strengthens teeth and prevents infections of the mouth.  Careful, though – it tastes and smells horrible!
  4. Aside from fighting bacteria, chaparral plants are known to kill off harmful fungi and microbes.  This herb can effectively eliminate parasitic entities in the body.
  5. When the leaves of the chaparral herb are dried and used to make tea, it will break down and dispel mucus and open up the respiratory system.  It is an all-natural symptom reliever for colds and other respiratory sickness.
  6. Chaparral tea also improves the digestive system.  Many take herbal capsules for this instead.
  7. As a surface medicine, chaparral may be used in lotions to alleviate pain and damage from burns.  It acts similar to aloe vera.
  8. The herb is also used as a topical medication for alleviating bruises and rashes.  It also facilitates faster natural healing in the body, kills bacteria to prevent infections, and stops many diseases in their tracks.
  9. Chaparral is one of the few successful natural relievers of symptoms for chicken pox.  It soothes inflammations, both internally and externally, and has been used for conditions such as carpal tunnel and arthritis.
  10. Finally, chaparral is an alternative to the vast market of chemical solutions for dandruff.

Cautions of Chaparral

While it provides many benefits, chaparral can sometimes be dangerous to young children and the very elderly due to its raw herbal strength.  It is best to gradually expose the body to increasingly large amounts so that if any problems do arise, they can be addressed immediately before any harm is done.  Adults between the ages of 20 and 60 should not have trouble with this herb, but it is always better to be safe than sorry.

As with anything, one can develop a chaparral toxicity.  This happens when too much of the herb is taken into the bloodstream.  Generally this occurs more often in those who take concentrated supplements.  Toxicity may result in liver damage, kidney failure, and in a few rare cases it has even been the suspected cause of hepatitis.

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Sagar is co-founder and CTO at Multia, a leading creative agency in Pune. He started his venture when he was 16, he has won numerous international and national web development competitions and has worked on 100+ web, mobile and online marketing projects. He’s a globe-trotter and has traveled to San Francisco, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Dubai, Jakarta and Bali Islands.
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