It’s Easy To Quit Drinking

It’s Easy To Quit Drinking

Giving up alcohol is any easy decision; sticking to it is what is hard! And contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to run to a rehab facility to wean yourself off the alcohol. Unless you’re a chronic alcoholic, you can do your part at home, as well. Of course you’ll still have to detox under medical supervision…it’s not uncommon for people wanting to quit alcohol on their own. Sooner or later, all alcoholics realize the damage and pain they’ve inflicted on people and relationships around them.  This realization is what will lead them to quit drinking.

However, one of the biggest problems with the idea of quitting drinking on your own is that the inability to control one’s addiction is the very reason people spiral into chronic alcoholism in the first place. Addiction is a disease of the mind. And while you need a support group to help you through this, too much of dependency on them can lead to a relapse. Use them for what they are-support-for it’s your sobriety that’s at stake. At the same time, you’ll benefit from connecting with others in recovery, and understand and support others around you. Helping others of those around you can help you as well.

In order to battle alcoholism on your own, a plan will need to be formulated. To help you come up with and stick to one, a few tips are listed below-

1. Let the public know your intention:

It’s all well and good that you are absolutely insistent on staying away from alcohol. Well, look around you- the world is full of alcohol. Parties, social gathering, corporate meeting all have alcohol. Being a social recluse and staying away from the world will not help your decision. You need to tell people that you’re staying off alcohol, so that they know they have to stop offering you a drink. Because, you might resist the first 3 offering, but you will give in and take the next few that come your way.

2. Detox:

During the length of your alcoholism, you’ve conditioned your body to be dependent on alcohol. So if you happen to skip your session of drinking, your body will begin to protest and you will experience symptoms that will be rather difficult to get through. Resuming drinking will naturally seem as the better option. To avoid exactly this from happening, you need to check yourself into a detox facility where your symptoms will be monitored and you’ll successfully detoxify yourself from alcohol, under medical supervision.

3. Abstinence is key:

Once you’re back from the detox session, you need to stay completely off alcohol. There is no way you can go back to drinking socially, if at all. Either stay off or enjoy the short sabbatical until you fall off the wagon. Since alcohol had been the whole and soul of your life during your alcoholism, you need to fill in your time with other healthier substitutes now. For example, get rid of all the alcohol in your house and stop meeting people with whom you used to drink. Increase you productive at your work place, or look for one if you are without employment.

Indulge in a variety of activities like giving back to society by volunteering at shelters and charities and hit the gym and work on your personal health and fitness. Work at re-building the relations with people you have hurt because of your condition. One of the most important aspects of the healing process is to forgive yourself and make amends.

4. If you fail, admit it:

The very fact that you want to undertake recovery on your own is commendable. However, you are bound to have those moments where it takes everything you have to not run to the bottle. If you do happen to give in, don’t consider that as a failed procedure. Pick yourself up from there and go ahead with fiercer intent. But if you do keep going back to the bottle when the going gets tough, you might need some external help.

5. Transition to a new life:

Following abstinence from alcohol, you will gradually start to build a new life sans alcohol. You will soon begin to replace alcohol with more productive and healthy options to aid you recovery. Very soon, you will no longer be in recovery and will realize that you have made a life for yourself that does not include whiskey or rum…

One thing, however, remains constant. Keep looking for reasons to move forward. Once you realize you’re no longer dependent on alcohol, you could become complacent and that could lead to a relapse. The aim here is to look at a holistic growth. You rid yourself off alcohol and you get a new lease on your life. That’s quite a big deal.

Long term recovery is about more than simply avoiding alcohol. It’s about building your self-esteem and harbouring relationships and staying happy by keeping your mind, body and health sharp. Your mindset should be to always look ahead and strive to be a better person.

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Sagar is co-founder and CTO at Multia, a leading creative agency in Pune. He started his venture when he was 16, he has won numerous international and national web development competitions and has worked on 100+ web, mobile and online marketing projects. He’s a globe-trotter and has traveled to San Francisco, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Dubai, Jakarta and Bali Islands.
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