The Pomeranian

The Pomeranian

One of the easiest dogs to train, that you’ll ever come across, the Pomeranian is loyal and doting pet whose eager to learn new tricks and please you, makes training them a walk in the park. Also called the ‘Pom’, they are the perfect combination of wanting to cuddle with you indoors to being up for a walk when the time is right.

Poms are known to be quite territorial which actually makes them quite the pick for watchdogs. They’re quick to sense any suspicious strangers and bark to announce their unwanted arrival. Being an indoor dog, it might take time to housebreak them at first. Adapting well to older children, younger children and other house pets tend to make the Pomeranians a little nervous. If raised with other house pets, you should experience no trouble.

A few things you would want to prepare yourself with- don’t let the Poms on anything at a height. Because of their small size, they are prone to injuries should they topple to the ground. Known to be picky eaters, their food intake needs to be monitored and regular trips to the canine dentist is a must; formation of tartar is a frequent occurrence.

Sensitive to warm weather, Pomeranians often seek out cool places or enjoy a splash in their water bowl. You could lay down a wet sack for them somewhere in the balcony or the yard so they can cool off the heat without suffering too much…

 

Appearance:

Average Height-

Identifying Features-

Average Weight-

3-10 lbs

 

Care & Health:

– Major concerns: patellar luxation

– Minor concerns: open fontanel, hypoglycemia, shoulder luxation, PRA, entropion

– Occasionally seen: tracheal collapse, PDA

– Suggested tests: knee, eye, (cardiac)

– Life span: 12 – 16 years

– Grooming: You could either brush the coat daily to avoid clumps of fur all over the house or give the Pom an occasional brushing.

 

History:

The Pomeranian is said to have come from the region of Pomerania, an area that included parts of both Germany and Poland. The name ‘Pomeranian’ was bestowed upon the breed, when it was brought to England, in honour of its homeland and recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1870.

Today’s Poms are a lot smaller than what they were in the late 1800. They were bred to a smaller size fit for city life. In 1888, Queen Victoria was gifted with a Pomeranian, and the breed’s association with this influential monarch did much for its popularity all over the world. By 1900, the Pomeranian had been recognized by the American Kennel Club and today, the Pomeranian’s manageable size and feisty character have made it one of the most popular breed.

As of 2007, the Pomeranians rank 13th out of 157 breeds.

 

 

 

pomeranian-02
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!
pomeranian-01
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!

The following two tabs change content below.
sagarpatil86@gmail.com'
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!
Sagar is co-founder and CTO at Multia, a leading creative agency in Pune. He started his venture when he was 16, he has won numerous international and national web development competitions and has worked on 100+ web, mobile and online marketing projects. He’s a globe-trotter and has traveled to San Francisco, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Dubai, Jakarta and Bali Islands.
sagarpatil86@gmail.com'
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!
  • Share On Facebook
  • Share On Twitter
  • Pin it!

Latest posts by Sagar Patil (see all)

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This