The Silky Terrier

The Silky Terrier

Description:

The Silky Terrier is absolutely devoted to its owner. Not only does it develop a strong bond with you, it will also follow you wherever you go. Don’t mistake it to be a mellow lap dog though. The abundant energy it comes with, you can’t afford to let him get bored. The strong chasing instincts they come with, will require to put them on a leash when outdoors. Daily walks and runs are a must to contain the stamina that is inherent in the Silky Terriers.

Like all terriers, Silky Terriers aren’t very good at socializing with other animals, regardless of their size. If you’re planning to keep two pets, then buy them both at the same time so they’re used to each other. This aggressive behaviour also extends to strangers, which makes them excellent watchdogs. They use their keen sense of hearing to seek out any threats to their family or territory and indulge in loud high-pitched barks when they sense danger.

If there’s one thing a Silky Terrier loves, it’s to bark. You could however, train them not to bark unnecessarily. Being easy to train and a quick learner, you could experience some stubbornness on their part along with being difficult to housebreak. Just be firm and patient and use motivational techniques to get them to listen to you!

The Silky Terrier is no exception when it comes to getting along well with older children. Younger children tend to man handle dogs, which could lead to nasty retaliations.

 

Appearance:

Average Height-

Identifying Features-

Average Weight-

6-15 lbs

 

Care & Health:

– Major concerns: none

– Minor concerns: intervertebral disc disease, elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation, Legg – Perthes

– Occasionally seen: diabetes, epilepsy, tracheal collapse

– Suggested tests: elbow, knee

– Life span: 11 – 14 years

– Grooming: Brush the fur every day for 10-15min to avoid tangles and clip the coat every 6 weeks.

 

History:

Originating in Sydney, Australia, the Silky Terrier was a result of cross-breeding of the Yorkshire Terriers and the Australian Terriers in the 1980s. . A certain standing for the breed was first set in 1926, then refined in 1955, wherein the name “Australian Silky Terrier” was decided for the new breed. It’s said that only after World War II, when soldiers who had been stationed in Australia, took the Australian Silky Terrier home with them to the United States. In 1932 legislation in Australia brought an end to crossbreeding in the 20th century. In 1955, the Silky Terrier Club of America was formed.

The American Kennel Club recognized the Silky Terrier in 1959. The Silky Terrier continues to be very popular both as a companion and as a show dog. Its AKC popularity was ranked 74th out of 157 in 2007. Even though it’s not a rare breed, its popularity has always been mediocre.

 

 

 

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sagarpatil86@gmail.com'
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Sagar is co-founder and CTO at Multia, a leading creative agency in Pune. He started his venture when he was 16, he has won numerous international and national web development competitions and has worked on 100+ web, mobile and online marketing projects. He’s a globe-trotter and has traveled to San Francisco, Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Dubai, Jakarta and Bali Islands.
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